World Social Psychiatry

PERSPECTIVE/VIEWPOINT
Year
: 2022  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 78--84

Beyond Shared Care in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: Collaborative Care and Community Consultations


Vincenzo Di Nicola 
 Department of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal University Institute of Mental Health, Montreal, QC, Canada; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Vincenzo Di Nicola
Department of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal University Ianstitute of Mental Health, Montreal, QC, Canada; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

Based in the multicultural context of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, this article reviews shared care and collaborative care models which privilege consultations between primary and specialty care in children's mental health. An overview of Canada's two largest child psychiatric epidemiological studies outlines the nonclinical community prevalence in Ontario (18.5%) and Quebec (15%) of children's mental health problems along with salient family and community risk factors. Given the high prevalence of children's mental health problems and the burden of care undertaken by primary care practitioners, the interface between the first line of care and mental health services is crucial yet often characterized by poor communication, a lack of mutual comprehension, and limited collaboration. Collaborative mental health care has been defined as “a family physician or other primary care provider working together with a psychiatrist or other mental health worker in a mutually supportive partnership.” This definition is extended to describe a spectrum of partnerships in child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP): shared care, collaborative care, and related collaborative community practices. The author's experience with these models is presented with an overview of a pilot study on CAP shared care in Montreal. Two other recent trends in Quebec are explored: an innovation called “Medical Specialists Responding in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry” for community mental health-care teams and the pair aidant or “peer helper” model reaching out to patients and families with a member who suffers from mental health problem to serve as a helper, a model, and part of the support network.


How to cite this article:
Di Nicola V. Beyond Shared Care in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: Collaborative Care and Community Consultations.World Soc Psychiatry 2022;4:78-84


How to cite this URL:
Di Nicola V. Beyond Shared Care in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: Collaborative Care and Community Consultations. World Soc Psychiatry [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Oct 1 ];4:78-84
Available from: https://www.worldsocpsychiatry.org/article.asp?issn=2667-1077;year=2022;volume=4;issue=2;spage=78;epage=84;aulast=Di;type=0